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    WELCOME: Rupanyup Primary School foundation students, seated from left, George Rodier, Grace Cooper, Georgie McAllister, Isaac Foster, Joseph Knight and Liam Trotter, joined grade two students Rhett Rutherford, left, and Elaina Grice, right, when term one began. Picture: PAUL CARRACHER
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    WELCOME: Rupanyup Primary School foundation students, seated from left, George Rodier, Grace Cooper, Georgie McAllister, Isaac Foster, Joseph Knight and Liam Trotter, joined grade two students Rhett Rutherford, left, and Elaina Grice, right, when term one began. Picture: PAUL CARRACHER

Rupanyup Primary School population grows

By Sean O’Connell

An influx of new faces has seen Rupanyup Primary School’s student population boosted to 35. 

Acting principal Jane McLean said six foundation students started in term one and she believed the increased number of enrolments was the highest in several years.

“There’s quite a number of new families starting this year and there’s more siblings to come along,” she said. 



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Foundation student Liam Trotter said he enjoyed playing with toys since starting at the school. 

Classmates Georgie McAllister and Grace Cooper said they had enjoyed playing on the school’s playground.

Mrs McLean said other offerings at or near the school, including an on-site preschool program and kindergarten in town, had also influenced enrolments.

“I think the out-of-school care program and the playgroup program the Rupanyup Primary School hosts plays a significant role in encouraging people to come to the school,” she said.

“Before and after school care enables the students to stay at their local school.” 

Mrs McLean said the number of new students starting was encouraging and would benefit students already at the school and future enrolments. 

“With those sorts of numbers, it enables extra activities to happen. It’s good for peer interaction for the students,” she said. 

“It enables two classrooms to operate, which helps individual teaching, because you are breaking it down and not teaching at such a broad level.

“We have a tutoring program, we have specialist art, sports and science programs, Auslan with a couple of extra teachers that come in – and that helps to develop the whole child.

“It’s a bit of a fallacy, people think you have to go to a big school to get everything, when in fact a small school provides so much more, it’s a much more enriching, personalised education.”

The entire February 7, 2024 edition of The Weekly Advertiser is available online. READ IT HERE!